Complete Body Nutrition

Live longer, healthier and happier


Leave a comment

Avoid these 10 Foods that are Guaranteed to Make you Fat!!

Medical Staff Tending a Patient ca. 1980s-1990s

We can’t afford to be overweight and obese. Let’s learn how to do something about this now! Start with learning which foods make us fat. Many of these you will already know about as it is common sense.

1. Artificial Sweeteners:

Diet soda does have less calories and less sugar than regular soda. This doesn’t mean it’s healthy. A study found that people who drank two or more diet sodas a day had six times the waistline compared to those who skip the diet cola.

Research has also shown that NutraSweet, one of the most popular artificial sweeteners, leads to the same surge of insulin as white carbs (see No 7 food below) –- because of sweetness detectors in the small intestine.

2. White sugar is full of calories that sabotage healthy eating and prime your palate to crave sweets.

The world is filled with sugar addicts. When our blood sugars are high we are high. When our blood sugar is low, we feel totally run down and exhausted and want more sugar. Sugar has no vitamins or minerals, just lots of fat-building calories. Watch out for hidden sugars!

3. Cheese can be a fattening food.

It contains a large amount of fat and is hard to digest. (a deadly combination)

Poor digestion causes weight gain! Fat has nine calories per gram, protein and carbohydrates have only four.

The most fattening food in the world is considered to be cheese fries.

4. Gluten rich foods are fattening but so are most common gluten free packaged products.

Read the labels; they are full of starch and sugar. A study discovered that it was easy to eat too many slices of bread in one sitting.

5. Potatoes were found to be the top food making us fat. This surprised me!But the study found potatoes to be top of the list. Who would have guessed.

fries<

The study found all forms to be fattening. Every serving of fries eaten in a day was linked to weight gain of more than three pounds, while eating an extra serving of potato chips led to a gain of 1.69 pounds.

6. Alcohol blocks the body from burning fat.

Alcohol increases the release of the hormone cortisol that breaks down muscle and retains fat. The loss of muscle can slowdown metabolism making it easier to gain weight. Also, alcohol causes a drop in testosterone in men, a hormone which helps burn fat.

Fat metabolism can be reduced by as much as 73 percent after only two drinks of vodka and lemonade in a one hour time period. (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition). Alcohol dehydrates the body which needs to be hydrated to build muscle and burn fat. (Had no idea that alcohol would be fattening on its own)

7. White Carbs (white rice, pasta, white bread, and starches) are fattening because they are high glycemic index foods. This we all know.

A study suggests that such carbs are a problem for people wanting to lose body fat. Findings show that consumption of the wrong carbs creates body fat. Ludwig and his colleagues at Children’s Hospital Boston

fat people

8. Bad Fats and Oils are fattening especially when they come as deep fried foods and baked goods.

Fats and oils also contain 120 calories per tablespoon. Even olive oil has lots of calories even though it has significant health benefits. Things like Avocado’s which are very high in fat are ok because there is a huge difference between good fats and bad.

9. Processed Foods are loaded with calories and almost no nutrients!

Diet microwave meals and frozen meals are high in sodium and calorie-rich fat to preserve flavor. Eating them causes you to retain water in your arms and legs, leaving you puffy.

Research by the London University College team, suggests that a diet high in processed food increases the risk of depression.

10. Processed meats (lunch meats, bacon, sausage, hot dogs) are high in calories, fat and sodium.

Sixty eight percent of bacon’s calories come from fat, almost half is saturated fat and each ounce has 30 milligrams of cholesterol.

Too much salt in your body leads to water retention and bloating. NO amount of processed meat is considered safe to eat, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research.

This is not speaking of meat in general….just processed meat.

We are the result of what we eat.

we are what we eat

Let’s not short change our body with foods high in fat, sugar, and chemicals. If you are still eating many of the foods listed above, simply start decreasing the quantity until you are in control. (Every bit helps!)

How do you decrease the “bad” foods. It’s simple. Increase the GOOD ones!

Everyone already know the good foods: fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and quality proteins. If you needed to choose the best food group, it would be vegetables.


Leave a comment

Splitting or Cracking Nails- All Natural Solution

egg yolk n olive oil

It’s the time of year when everything is starting to cool down and the dramatic changes in temperatures can cause our nails to get dry and brittle and even split.

Try this all natural recipe to keep your nails healthy and strong all year around.

Mix:

2 eggs yolks
1 teaspoon of olive or avocado oil

Soak nails for 5-10 mins twice a week.

The biotin in the egg yolk and the triglycerides in the olive oil penetrate the nail bed and work to nourish  and strengthen nails.

Enjoy!


Leave a comment

Cholesterol: Top 5 foods to lower your numbers

cholesterol

 

 

 

 

 

Diet can play an important role in lowering your cholesterol. Here are five foods that can lower your cholesterol and protect your heart.

Can a bowl of oatmeal help lower your cholesterol? How about a handful of walnuts or even a baked potato topped with some heart-healthy margarine? A few simple tweaks to your diet — like these, along with exercise and other heart-healthy habits — may be helpful in lowering your cholesterol.

1. Oatmeal, oat bran and high-fiber foods

Oatmeal contains soluble fiber, which reduces your low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the “bad,” cholesterol. Soluble fiber is also found in such foods as kidney beans, apples, pears, barley and prunes.

Soluble fiber can reduce the absorption of cholesterol into your bloodstream. Five to 10 grams or more of soluble fiber a day decreases your total and LDL cholesterol. Eating 1 1/2 cups of cooked oatmeal provides 6 grams of fiber. If you add fruit, such as bananas, you’ll add about 4 more grams of fiber. To mix it up a little, try steel-cut oatmeal or cold cereal made with oatmeal or oat bran.

2. Fish and omega-3 fatty acids

Eating fatty fish can be heart healthy because of its high levels of omega-3 fatty acids, which can reduce your blood pressure and risk of developing blood clots. In people who have already had heart attacks, fish oil — or omega-3 fatty acids — reduces the risk of sudden death.

The highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids are in:

Mackerel
Lake trout
Herring
Sardines
Albacore tuna
Salmon
Halibut
You should bake or grill the fish to avoid adding unhealthy fats. If you don’t like fish, you can also get small amounts of omega-3 fatty acids from foods like ground flaxseed or canola oil.

You can take an omega-3 or fish oil supplement to get some of the benefits, but you won’t get other nutrients in fish, such as selenium. If you decide to take a supplement, just remember to watch your diet and eat lean meat or vegetables in place of fish.

3. Walnuts, almonds and other nuts

Walnuts, almonds and other nuts can reduce blood cholesterol. Rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, walnuts also help keep blood vessels healthy.

Eating about a handful (1.5 ounces, or 42.5 grams) a day of most nuts, such as almonds, hazelnuts, peanuts, pecans, some pine nuts, pistachio nuts and walnuts, may reduce your risk of heart disease. Just make sure the nuts you eat aren’t salted or coated with sugar.

All nuts are high in calories, so a handful will do. To avoid eating too many nuts and gaining weight, replace foods high in saturated fat with nuts. For example, instead of using cheese, meat or croutons in your salad, add a handful of walnuts or almonds.

4. Olive oil

Olive oil contains a potent mix of antioxidants that can lower your “bad” (LDL) cholesterol but leave your “good” (HDL) cholesterol untouched.

Try using about 2 tablespoons (23 grams) of olive oil a day in place of other fats in your diet to get its heart-healthy benefits. To add olive oil to your diet, you can saute vegetables in it, add it to a marinade or mix it with vinegar as a salad dressing. You can also use olive oil as a substitute for butter when basting meat or as a dip for bread. Olive oil is high in calories, so don’t eat more than the recommended amount.

The cholesterol-lowering effects of olive oil are even greater if you choose extra-virgin olive oil, meaning the oil is less processed and contains more heart-healthy antioxidants. But keep in mind that “light” olive oils are usually more processed than extra-virgin or virgin olive oils and are lighter in color, not fat or calories.

5. Foods with added plant sterols or stanols

Foods are now available that have been fortified with sterols or stanols — substances found in plants that help block the absorption of cholesterol.

Orange juice and yogurt drinks with added plant sterols can help reduce LDL cholesterol by more than 10 percent. The amount of daily plant sterols needed for results is at least 2 grams — which equals about two 8-ounce (237-milliliter) servings of plant sterol-fortified orange juice a day.

Plant sterols or stanols in fortified foods don’t appear to affect levels of triglycerides or of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the “good” cholesterol.

Other changes to your diet

For any of these foods to provide their benefit, you need to make other changes to your diet and lifestyle.

Cut back on the cholesterol and total fat — especially saturated and trans fats — that you eat. Saturated fats, like those in meat, full-fat dairy products and some oils, raise your total cholesterol. Trans fats, which are sometimes found in margarines and store-bought cookies, crackers and cakes, are particularly bad for your cholesterol levels. Trans fats raise low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the “bad,” cholesterol, and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the “good,” cholesterol.

High cholesterol is a very serious issue and your doctor may want to put you on medication to lower it. Before your cholesterol gets out of control try implementing a few of these suggestions.

In addition to changing your diet, keep in mind that making additional heart-healthy lifestyle changes are key to lowering your cholesterol. Talk to your doctor or health care provider about exercising, quitting smoking and maintaining a healthy weight to help keep your cholesterol level low.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 373 other followers