Complete Body Nutrition

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Avoid these 10 Foods that are Guaranteed to Make you Fat!!

Medical Staff Tending a Patient ca. 1980s-1990s

We can’t afford to be overweight and obese. Let’s learn how to do something about this now! Start with learning which foods make us fat. Many of these you will already know about as it is common sense.

1. Artificial Sweeteners:

Diet soda does have less calories and less sugar than regular soda. This doesn’t mean it’s healthy. A study found that people who drank two or more diet sodas a day had six times the waistline compared to those who skip the diet cola.

Research has also shown that NutraSweet, one of the most popular artificial sweeteners, leads to the same surge of insulin as white carbs (see No 7 food below) –- because of sweetness detectors in the small intestine.

2. White sugar is full of calories that sabotage healthy eating and prime your palate to crave sweets.

The world is filled with sugar addicts. When our blood sugars are high we are high. When our blood sugar is low, we feel totally run down and exhausted and want more sugar. Sugar has no vitamins or minerals, just lots of fat-building calories. Watch out for hidden sugars!

3. Cheese can be a fattening food.

It contains a large amount of fat and is hard to digest. (a deadly combination)

Poor digestion causes weight gain! Fat has nine calories per gram, protein and carbohydrates have only four.

The most fattening food in the world is considered to be cheese fries.

4. Gluten rich foods are fattening but so are most common gluten free packaged products.

Read the labels; they are full of starch and sugar. A study discovered that it was easy to eat too many slices of bread in one sitting.

5. Potatoes were found to be the top food making us fat. This surprised me!But the study found potatoes to be top of the list. Who would have guessed.

fries<

The study found all forms to be fattening. Every serving of fries eaten in a day was linked to weight gain of more than three pounds, while eating an extra serving of potato chips led to a gain of 1.69 pounds.

6. Alcohol blocks the body from burning fat.

Alcohol increases the release of the hormone cortisol that breaks down muscle and retains fat. The loss of muscle can slowdown metabolism making it easier to gain weight. Also, alcohol causes a drop in testosterone in men, a hormone which helps burn fat.

Fat metabolism can be reduced by as much as 73 percent after only two drinks of vodka and lemonade in a one hour time period. (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition). Alcohol dehydrates the body which needs to be hydrated to build muscle and burn fat. (Had no idea that alcohol would be fattening on its own)

7. White Carbs (white rice, pasta, white bread, and starches) are fattening because they are high glycemic index foods. This we all know.

A study suggests that such carbs are a problem for people wanting to lose body fat. Findings show that consumption of the wrong carbs creates body fat. Ludwig and his colleagues at Children’s Hospital Boston

fat people

8. Bad Fats and Oils are fattening especially when they come as deep fried foods and baked goods.

Fats and oils also contain 120 calories per tablespoon. Even olive oil has lots of calories even though it has significant health benefits. Things like Avocado’s which are very high in fat are ok because there is a huge difference between good fats and bad.

9. Processed Foods are loaded with calories and almost no nutrients!

Diet microwave meals and frozen meals are high in sodium and calorie-rich fat to preserve flavor. Eating them causes you to retain water in your arms and legs, leaving you puffy.

Research by the London University College team, suggests that a diet high in processed food increases the risk of depression.

10. Processed meats (lunch meats, bacon, sausage, hot dogs) are high in calories, fat and sodium.

Sixty eight percent of bacon’s calories come from fat, almost half is saturated fat and each ounce has 30 milligrams of cholesterol.

Too much salt in your body leads to water retention and bloating. NO amount of processed meat is considered safe to eat, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research.

This is not speaking of meat in general….just processed meat.

We are the result of what we eat.

we are what we eat

Let’s not short change our body with foods high in fat, sugar, and chemicals. If you are still eating many of the foods listed above, simply start decreasing the quantity until you are in control. (Every bit helps!)

How do you decrease the “bad” foods. It’s simple. Increase the GOOD ones!

Everyone already know the good foods: fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and quality proteins. If you needed to choose the best food group, it would be vegetables.


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Cholesterol: Top 5 foods to lower your numbers

cholesterol

 

 

 

 

 

Diet can play an important role in lowering your cholesterol. Here are five foods that can lower your cholesterol and protect your heart.

Can a bowl of oatmeal help lower your cholesterol? How about a handful of walnuts or even a baked potato topped with some heart-healthy margarine? A few simple tweaks to your diet — like these, along with exercise and other heart-healthy habits — may be helpful in lowering your cholesterol.

1. Oatmeal, oat bran and high-fiber foods

Oatmeal contains soluble fiber, which reduces your low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the “bad,” cholesterol. Soluble fiber is also found in such foods as kidney beans, apples, pears, barley and prunes.

Soluble fiber can reduce the absorption of cholesterol into your bloodstream. Five to 10 grams or more of soluble fiber a day decreases your total and LDL cholesterol. Eating 1 1/2 cups of cooked oatmeal provides 6 grams of fiber. If you add fruit, such as bananas, you’ll add about 4 more grams of fiber. To mix it up a little, try steel-cut oatmeal or cold cereal made with oatmeal or oat bran.

2. Fish and omega-3 fatty acids

Eating fatty fish can be heart healthy because of its high levels of omega-3 fatty acids, which can reduce your blood pressure and risk of developing blood clots. In people who have already had heart attacks, fish oil — or omega-3 fatty acids — reduces the risk of sudden death.

The highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids are in:

Mackerel
Lake trout
Herring
Sardines
Albacore tuna
Salmon
Halibut
You should bake or grill the fish to avoid adding unhealthy fats. If you don’t like fish, you can also get small amounts of omega-3 fatty acids from foods like ground flaxseed or canola oil.

You can take an omega-3 or fish oil supplement to get some of the benefits, but you won’t get other nutrients in fish, such as selenium. If you decide to take a supplement, just remember to watch your diet and eat lean meat or vegetables in place of fish.

3. Walnuts, almonds and other nuts

Walnuts, almonds and other nuts can reduce blood cholesterol. Rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, walnuts also help keep blood vessels healthy.

Eating about a handful (1.5 ounces, or 42.5 grams) a day of most nuts, such as almonds, hazelnuts, peanuts, pecans, some pine nuts, pistachio nuts and walnuts, may reduce your risk of heart disease. Just make sure the nuts you eat aren’t salted or coated with sugar.

All nuts are high in calories, so a handful will do. To avoid eating too many nuts and gaining weight, replace foods high in saturated fat with nuts. For example, instead of using cheese, meat or croutons in your salad, add a handful of walnuts or almonds.

4. Olive oil

Olive oil contains a potent mix of antioxidants that can lower your “bad” (LDL) cholesterol but leave your “good” (HDL) cholesterol untouched.

Try using about 2 tablespoons (23 grams) of olive oil a day in place of other fats in your diet to get its heart-healthy benefits. To add olive oil to your diet, you can saute vegetables in it, add it to a marinade or mix it with vinegar as a salad dressing. You can also use olive oil as a substitute for butter when basting meat or as a dip for bread. Olive oil is high in calories, so don’t eat more than the recommended amount.

The cholesterol-lowering effects of olive oil are even greater if you choose extra-virgin olive oil, meaning the oil is less processed and contains more heart-healthy antioxidants. But keep in mind that “light” olive oils are usually more processed than extra-virgin or virgin olive oils and are lighter in color, not fat or calories.

5. Foods with added plant sterols or stanols

Foods are now available that have been fortified with sterols or stanols — substances found in plants that help block the absorption of cholesterol.

Orange juice and yogurt drinks with added plant sterols can help reduce LDL cholesterol by more than 10 percent. The amount of daily plant sterols needed for results is at least 2 grams — which equals about two 8-ounce (237-milliliter) servings of plant sterol-fortified orange juice a day.

Plant sterols or stanols in fortified foods don’t appear to affect levels of triglycerides or of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the “good” cholesterol.

Other changes to your diet

For any of these foods to provide their benefit, you need to make other changes to your diet and lifestyle.

Cut back on the cholesterol and total fat — especially saturated and trans fats — that you eat. Saturated fats, like those in meat, full-fat dairy products and some oils, raise your total cholesterol. Trans fats, which are sometimes found in margarines and store-bought cookies, crackers and cakes, are particularly bad for your cholesterol levels. Trans fats raise low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the “bad,” cholesterol, and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the “good,” cholesterol.

High cholesterol is a very serious issue and your doctor may want to put you on medication to lower it. Before your cholesterol gets out of control try implementing a few of these suggestions.

In addition to changing your diet, keep in mind that making additional heart-healthy lifestyle changes are key to lowering your cholesterol. Talk to your doctor or health care provider about exercising, quitting smoking and maintaining a healthy weight to help keep your cholesterol level low.


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Puffy Face or Eyes- Quick fix

eyes

We’ve all had those days where we wake up, look in the mirror and than try to remember the train that apparently ran us over the night before. Here is a quick fix for reducing redness and puffiness to get you looking glam-tastic again.

* Fill a big bowl with ice cubes and put some aloe juice in it.- You can use fresh aloe or aloe juice you buy at the health food store.
* Leave it for 5 to 10 minutes until it gets really nice and cold.
* Soak a face cloth in it and lay it over your face.

It instantly reduces inflammation taking away any puffiness or swollen look.

*For an added spa feel- cut holes in one of your face clothes and place slices of cucumbers over your eyes.

It’s as simple that!!
Enjoy!


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Honey VS Sugar

honey

In this day and age everyone is looking for an easier way to eat healthy, or the quickest way to loose those extra couple pounds. Sometimes it’s not about the easiest or fastest way that gets you to your goals but eliminating refined sugar from your life could be one of those methods.

Try replacing your sugar with honey, not only are you eliminating something refined and void of any nutrients that is actually really bad for you but you are replacing it with something that will still give you that sweet tooth fix but is packed full of nutrients, good bacteria (that aids in digestion and that our body requires) and powerful antioxidants called polyphenols. Antioxidants help to get rid of the free radicals in your body that cause diseases and pre mature aging. Let me make that crystal clear. Honey helps fight wrinkles and keeps you healthy!! Sometimes you can have your cake and eat it too!!

Try to find a unprocessed honey, possibly organic although no honey can truly be organic if it’s labeled the producer may have done their best to try and accomodate that.

Enjoy!!!


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Feeling sluggish, have insomnia and fatigue, gaining weight or finding yourself being a little moody from time to time? Maybe it’s time to look at your Thyroid Gland.

Thyroid gland
The thyroid gland controls how quickly the body uses energy, makes proteins, and controls how sensitive the body is to other hormones. It participates in these processes by producing thyroid hormones that regulate the growth and rate of function of many other systems in the body. T3 (triiodothyronine) and T4 (and thyroxine; sometimes referred to as tetraiodothyronin) are synthesized from iodine and tyrosine. The thyroid also produces calcitonin, which plays a role in calcium homeostasis.

What can I do if I think I may have an “out of whack” Thyroid?

There are a few different ways to test to see if your thyroid may be under or over active. In my opinion the best way is using a process called the Basal Temperature test.

Because the thyroid gland reflects the body’s metabolic rate and heat is generated during metabolism, assessing body temperature can give clues regarding the function of the thyroid gland.

1. Shake down a thermometer until the mercury falls below 95 degrees Fahrenheit if using an older thermometer. Place it by your bed at night when you retire.
2. Upon waking, before getting up (yes, even to use the bathroom) place the thermometer under your armpit for 10 minutes. Digital thermometers may automatically stop before that. That’s fine. Try to lay in bed as still as possible during this time. Rest and close your eyes. Don’t get up until after the 10 minutes have passed or until a digital thermometer has registered your temperature.
3. Record the temperature, time, and date.
4. Conduct the same test for at least three mornings at the same time each day.

Assessing Your Basal Temperature Test

A healthy resting temperature ranges between 97.8 to 98.2 degrees Fahrenheit or 36.6 to 36.8 degrees Celsius. Natural fluctuations can occur during menstrual cycles. If you are still menstruating, perform the test on the second, third, and fourth days of the menstrual cycle.
Post-menopausal women or men can conduct the tests any days of the month.

If your temperature is consistently lower than the range indicated above for at least three days, this may be an indication of hypothyroidism. Conversely, temperatures consistently higher than this may indicate hyperthyroidism but can also suggest a possible infection. If so, you should see a homeopathic doctor.

What else can I do?

You can also check your neck: An enlarged Thyroid gland can signal that your body is producing too much or too little thyroid hormone.

• Hold a mirror so you can see the front of your neck
• Take a sip of water and hold it in your mouth
• Still looking at the thyroid area
• Tip your head back and swallow

If you notice any bulges check with your homeopathic doctor.

Lastly, your medical physician can do a blood test. Ask him or her to test for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free T3, free T4, and thyroid antibodies. All four tests give a more accurate picture of the health of your thyroid gland than testing solely for TSH like many doctors do.

What do I do if something is not functioning properly?

1. Get more iodine in your body: a deficiency in this mineral is one of the leading causes of thyroid disease. It is essential to the production of thyroid hormones. Ever notice that your generic table salt is iodized sodium chloride? In many countries, iodine deficiency is a major public health problem that was cheaply addressed by purposely adding small amounts of iodine to the sodium chloride (salt). With everyone on a health kick and trying to reduce sodium, although that is a great idea, if salt was our main source of iodine we say an increase in thyroid related diseases.

Iodine

Foods high in Iodine: Salmon, Halibut, Eggs, Baked Potatoes, Milk (although I don’t generally support consumption of cow’s milk), Dried Seaweed, some Himalayan Salts, Turkey, Prunes, Navy Beans, Bananas and Strawberries to name a few.

2. Increase your Zinc: Zinc is another mineral extremely important to the production of thyroid hormones so increasing your consumption may be critical. Zinc can quickly become depleted from surgeries or injuries, taking birth control pills, reduced consumption or reduced absorption.

zinc

Foods high in Zinc: Oysters, Salmon, Pumpkin Seeds, Dark Chocolate, Garlic, Sesame Seeds, Wheat Germ, Chick peas, Shrimp, Mushrooms, Peanuts, Spinach, Kidney Beans, Flax Seeds and Turkey to name a few.

3. Boost your selenium: Not only is selenium a necessary mineral to the proper functioning of your thyroid but it’s also one of the most important minerals in fighting off cancer. A lot of soil around the world has become depleted of selenium providing foods (even organically grown) to be deficient of this power mineral. One-Two Brazil nuts a day is all your need as it houses enough selenium for your daily intake.

brazil-nuts

Other foods high in selenium are: Fish, Turkey, Chicken, Mushrooms, Barley, Sunflower Seeds, and Whole Grains.

I hope this article helps and as always feel free to email me if you have any further questions.
Have a wonderful day and may you live longer, healthier and happier.


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Blood type

blood

Do you think knowing your blood type is only important in the event of a transfusion?

Think again!

Research indicates that your blood type is a key genetic factor that influences many areas of health and well-being.

Throughout your life, you’ve probably observed that some people tend to lose weight more easily, while for others, their weight is an ongoing battle. Or wondered why some people are plagued by chronic illness while others stay healthy and vital well into their advanced years. Very simply, the answer is in your blood type.

Knowing your blood type is an important tool for understanding how your body reacts to food, your susceptibility to disease, your natural reaction to stress, and so much more. A single drop of blood contains a biochemical makeup as unique to you as your fingerprint.

Below are five facts about your blood type that could change your life:

1. Your blood type may predict your susceptibility for certain diseases.

Research has found that individuals of certain blood types may be at a higher risk for certain diseases; studies have found that people with blood type O have a lower risk for heart disease, but a higher risk for developing stomach ulcers. People who are blood type A have higher risks of microbial infections, but Type A women experience a higher rate of fertility. Other research has found that people with type AB and B blood have a much higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer.

2. People of different blood types react differently to stress.

Type A people naturally have higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol in their bodies and produce more in response to stressful situations. On the other hand, people with type O blood, have a “fight or flight” reaction to stress which results in the overproduction of adrenaline. It takes type O’s longer to recover from stress because it is more difficult for them to clear the adrenaline from their bodies.

3. Your blood type antigens are not just in your blood!

They are everywhere in your body, particularly in the surfaces that interact with the environment. These include your digestive tract, from your mouth to your large intestine, as well as your nasal passages and lungs. Because these blood type antigens are everywhere, they influence how your body reacts to the food you eat through several factors. For example: the lectins in certain foods bind to your blood type antigen and cause your blood to agglutinate (stick together), resulting in feelings of fatigue, headaches, digestive issues, skin problems and a host of other health issues.

4. Gut bacteria is related to blood type.

People of different blood types have different gut bacteria, in fact, certain bacteria are 50,000 more likely to turn up in people with one blood type or the other. This originated from our ancestors whose digestive tracts developed to accommodate one type of diet over another. For example, the microbiome of certain people developed to break down carbohydrates much more efficiently (blood type A). People lacking this ability (blood type O) tend to store carbs as fat.

5. A one-size-fits-all approach to nutrition does not work.

Food fads come and go, but the facts are clear: everyone does not have the same basic nutritional needs. We all know someone who is a strict vegetarian and thrives on that diet, while others swear by Atkins or similar low-carb plans. I’ve found that your nutritional needs can be determined by your blood type. Take a look at the food lists in Eat Right 4 Your Type; they are a guide for choosing the foods that will allow you to lose weight, reduce inflammation, increase energy and lead a longer, healthier life.

As you’ve learned, your blood type affects more than just the type of blood you’d need in the event of a transfusion – your blood type is a genetic factor that plays many roles in the human body. Choosing low-lectin, non-agglutinating foods that create a hospitable environment for your “good” intestinal flora and selecting foods that combat your disease risks are two good first steps in creating an individualized nutritional program just for you.